Search the Montessori Method/Search its Highlights

Search the Montessori Method/Search its Highlights

*Private school is more generalized, than the exact teaching method described in these articles below: The Montessori Method.  

    To truly appreciate the Montessori Method, let’s get you sold on private schooling first.

Why Private School?

Why Montessori?

    No matter what age your child is, it's never too late to put them in private school. With exposure to premium education with professional staff and activities to fill up your child's day, private schools can give your child what other schools can't. If you're still on the fence about whether your child should attend private school, we've compiled a list of what you can expect from privatized education and the continual benefits it will offer you and your child.

Being Held to a Higher Standard

    Every parents want the best for your child and so does their school. Private schools hold their students to a higher academic standard that will show when compared to children their age of public schools. Whether your child is in elementary or just about to graduate high school, private schools demand more graduation requirements that will further prepare them for what's ahead. Along with the course load and quality of work, private schools will ensure that your child is well-rounded with extracurricular activities that they will not only enjoy, but will prepare them for college.

    When a school as a whole raises the bar on how it wants its students to perform, every student is going to work to meet that bar. Where in public school, student success is left up to the internal motivation of the student, motivation from the school and it's educators is evident throughout.

Student-Teacher Ratio

    With a private school education, you can be sure that your child will be getting the attention that they deserve. Private schools offer smaller class sizes to cater to the special needs of each child. While public schools are overrun with too many students and few teachers, it's possible that your child could get lost in the sea of children. These small groups of students will not only allow the teacher to give your child more attention, but also help your child build strong connections and relationships.

    As opposed to public schools, teachers of private schools have first degrees in the subject that they teach. Teachers will have expert knowledge on their subject and you can ensure that your child will be taught by someone who will help them succeed.

Exposure

    When your child attends private school, they will be exposed to numerous opportunities to explore their interests in the community. Exposure to the arts, volunteer opportunities, and a specialized curriculum will give your child the chance to experience all that private school has to offer. Due to funding, private schools offer programs that are unheard of in public schools. While public schools lack in art, music, and other creative programs, most private schools offer extensive programs and continue to develop them as they wish.

    Private schools also offer superb facilities. "Learning labs" and media centers are stocked full of up-to-date technology and updated information. First rate athletics are what private schools are known for, having a large selection for students to choose from. Pools for swimming and fields for lacrosse and hockey are just a few of the sports that schools may offer.

    No matter what your child is interested in, private school is the number one place to experience anything they'd like. Participation is optional, but it is expected. Professional staff meets these extracurricular requirements so that your child can be coached by the best.

    There are numerous benefits to your child attending private school. When narrowing down your options, consider these qualities in a school. Brooksfield School can offer higher education opportunities and an outstanding staff that is dedicated to your child's success. Contact us for more information on private school education.

Contact us today!


 

    *The Montessori Method is explained along with its benefits.  The core values are discussed and listed in more detail in this article from the Brooksfield School blog.

Practical Life: The Skills of Daily Living - The Montessori Method

 

    As every parent knows, the preschool child wants to be with adults, to take part in the activities of daily adult life. The Montessori practical life materials allow him to do just that. When a child enters the preschool, the practical life area provides the link between home and school. In the classroom, with child-sized tools that really work, the young child is able to perform the same activities he has seen adults do: polishing, scrubbing, pouring, sweeping. The pace is unhurried, and an adult is nearby to help if needed but not to interfere.

    The young child is, of course, more interested in the scrubbing motion of washing a table than he is in getting the table clean. The motions help him gain gross motor control and hand-eye coordination, which will enable him to perform successively more precise tasks.

*Care of Environment: cleaning, sweeping, gardening, ironing, polishing, etc.

*Development of Social Relations: greeting, serving, accepting, apologizing, thanking, etc.

*Movement: balancing, “walking on the line,” playing the silence game, etc.

    It is often difficult for adults to appreciate the sense of accomplishment and pride that children take in mastering practical life skills. To the adult, care of the house and body are necessary chores. The young child, however, is attracted to these activities for very different reasons. They are meaningful, creative, filled with intricate movements and achievements that hold the children’s attention. They are easily understood from start to finish; they lead to greater physical skill, perfection of movement, and concentration.

    The young child is attracted to the practical life exercises because these activities allow her to function independently in the adult world. After learning how to button her coat, tie her shoes, and wash her hands, she spontaneously repeats the exercises, working on mastery, free from unnecessary adult intervention. These exercises correspond to the child’s sensitive period for refinement of movement and coordination as well as her growing sense of independence. “I can do it by myself” is the motto of the young child, and Montessori encourages and fosters this independence.

Contact us today!


 

*Exposing the end result of this method and how it reaches a specific group of students will be of great interest to someone looking to discover these teachings.

How Montessori Education Benefits Preschoolers

     For many parents, the path to their child's success begins in preschool. Many children begin preschool at age four, although many preschools accept three- and five-year-olds, as well. While each preschool facility is different, there are many common factors that contribute to toddlers' success and emotional development. Montessori programs often combine those positive factors into the overall curriculum of the school.

    One of the biggest aspects of successful preschool programs that is reflected in the Montessori curriculum is the importance of creating art. While Montessori children are encouraged to discover art in their own time as opposed to during a specific time of day, all toddlers can benefit from creating art. Preschoolers are inspired to organize thoughts and write stories about pictures they have drawn or painted, and the actions of drawing, writing, sculpting, and gluing help develop their fine motor skills.

    In addition to visual arts, the Montessori curriculum also includes music, which can help children develop rhythm and memorize facts, letters, numbers, and dates when they are set to a tune. Keeping music in schools benefits students in almost every area of development. Children who actively play music or sing before kindergarten have been shown to play better with others, have a higher understanding of reading and math, and possess higher self-esteem than children who do not.    

    In addition to allowing students to experiment with art and music at their own pace, Montessori education encourages children to learn from peers of different ages. This gives the younger children someone to look up to, as well as teaches the older children how to be an effective leader and mentor. Students who attend Montessori schools are more interested in learning, and have a greater attention span than traditionally-educated students.

     When looking for your child's preschool, it is important to find the right facility to meet your family's needs. Consider contacting your local Montessori school to find out how they can help your child thrive.

Contact us today!


 

    *How technology ties into the overall method is explained.  Interesting features and links to technology exist between the Montessori Method and technology.

 

Technology and the Montessori School

    Isn't it curious that quite a few people who have gone on to impact the world of technology received an early education that did not include the use of computers? According to an article published by the Montessori Society AMI UK, many of the titans of Silicon Valley attended a Montessori School at some time during their formative years.

     Larry Page, one of the founders of Google, was a student at Okemos Montessori School from 1975 to 1979. Sergey Brin, Google co-founder with Page, attended Paint Branch Montessori School in Adelphi, Maryland. When the two appeared on a Barbara Walters special, The Ten Most Fascinating People of 2004, they told her they credit their Montessori schools with allowing them to think for themselves, thus fostering their creativity. Brin for his part, feels that, by giving him the freedom to pursue activities that interested him, the Montessori environment set him on the path to becoming a self-directed self-starter.

     Will Wright, the designer of the popular video game, The Sims, went to a Montessori school in Atlanta until sixth grade and Jeff Bezos, of Amazon fame, attended a Montessori preschool in Houston, Texas. In an inspiring TED speech, Wright praised Montessori for how it "taught me the joy of discovery," ..... It's all about learning on your own terms rather than a teacher explaining stuff."

    Seeing the success of these Montessori students in the world of computers, one has to wonder what Maria Montessori, who was a scientist, herself, would have thought about the use of computers in early childhood education. First off, although she might have been impressed with how the internet is able to deliver content to a child any time he looks for it, she'd probably have issues with the fact that he's sitting in front of the glass of a computer monitor or an iPad touch screen filled with abstract symbols and bright simulations, rather than actively engaged with physical objects in a real, meaningful, experiential discovery.

    Montessori believed that during the first six years of life, a child benefits by physically engaging with objects so she can create classifications to house the impressions these activities give her. Therefore, might Maria Montessori not warn that delving into cyberspace and its virtual objects at a young age will rob her of manipulating the real thing and can result in a blurring of what is real and what is not.

    Neurological research into how the child's brain develops has validated Montessori's insistence on the importance of sensory and motor experiences during the early years. Studies have found that specific neural developments take place at different ages, and those that emerge between the ages of four and six benefit from appropriate motor and sensory activities. In other words, physical engagement feeds the specific neural areas while substituting  virtual experiences deprives them of this food, and prevents them from absorbing  how the natural world works.

   Whether Maria Montessori might raise these points is impossible to say, but many working in technology argue against computer use in the classroom. The global operations director at Allied Signal, which manufactures aerospace and automotive components, is one. He credits the hands-on activities of his elementary school days with building his self-confidence, saying "if you've ever had the experience of binding a book, knitting a sock, or playing a recorder, then you feel you can build a rocket, or learn a software program", which brings up a point technology instructors would agree with. Most older students will be able to acquire computer skills in a one semester course, especially if they are grounded in the autonomy gained by their years in Montessori.

    We certainly believe this at Brookfield School, and our alumni who've passed through our doors in our more than twenty-five years of nurturing education bear this out. If you want the Montessori experience for your child, contact us to find out about our Montessori preschool, elementary school, and our new expansion into middle school.



    *We have displayed quality selling points for “Why Private School?’ in general.  We have detailed the core benefits and values of the Montessori Method as well.  Benefits amongst re-schoolers using this method and technology give a grand scope of the Montessori Method.  Hopefully, this will help you make the decision between our curriculum and the standard ones not based upon as many values as this teaching displays.

Contact us today!

 

*Private school is more generalized, than the exact teaching method described in these articles below: The Montessori Method.

    To truly appreciate the Montessori Method, let’s get you sold on private schooling first.

Why Private School?

Why Montessori?

    No matter what age your child is, it's never too late to put them in private school. With exposure to premium education with professional staff and activities to fill up your child's day, private schools can give your child what other schools can't. If you're still on the fence about whether your child should attend private school, we've compiled a list of what you can expect from privatized education and the continual benefits it will offer you and your child.

Being Held to a Higher Standard

    Every parents want the best for your child and so does their school. Private schools hold their students to a higher academic standard that will show when compared to children their age of public schools. Whether your child is in elementary or just about to graduate high school, private schools demand more graduation requirements that will further prepare them for what's ahead. Along with the course load and quality of work, private schools will ensure that your child is well-rounded with extracurricular activities that they will not only enjoy, but will prepare them for college.

    When a school as a whole raises the bar on how it wants its students to perform, every student is going to work to meet that bar. Where in public school, student success is left up to the internal motivation of the student, motivation from the school and it's educators is evident throughout.

Student-Teacher Ratio

    With a private school education, you can be sure that your child will be getting the attention that they deserve. Private schools offer smaller class sizes to cater to the special needs of each child. While public schools are overrun with too many students and few teachers, it's possible that your child could get lost in the sea of children. These small groups of students will not only allow the teacher to give your child more attention, but also help your child build strong connections and relationships.

    As opposed to public schools, teachers of private schools have first degrees in the subject that they teach. Teachers will have expert knowledge on their subject and you can ensure that your child will be taught by someone who will help them succeed.

Exposure

    When your child attends private school, they will be exposed to numerous opportunities to explore their interests in the community. Exposure to the arts, volunteer opportunities, and a specialized curriculum will give your child the chance to experience all that private school has to offer. Due to funding, private schools offer programs that are unheard of in public schools. While public schools lack in art, music, and other creative programs, most private schools offer extensive programs and continue to develop them as they wish.

    Private schools also offer superb facilities. "Learning labs" and media centers are stocked full of up-to-date technology and updated information. First rate athletics are what private schools are known for, having a large selection for students to choose from. Pools for swimming and fields for lacrosse and hockey are just a few of the sports that schools may offer.

    No matter what your child is interested in, private school is the number one place to experience anything they'd like. Participation is optional, but it is expected. Professional staff meets these extracurricular requirements so that your child can be coached by the best.

    There are numerous benefits to your child attending private school. When narrowing down your options, consider these qualities in a school. Brooksfield School can offer higher education opportunities and an outstanding staff that is dedicated to your child's success. Contact us for more information on private school education.

Contact us today!


 

    *The Montessori Method is explained along with its benefits.  The core values are discussed and listed in more detail in this article from the Brooksfield School blog.

Practical Life: The Skills of Daily Living - The Montessori Method

 

    As every parent knows, the preschool child wants to be with adults, to take part in the activities of daily adult life. The Montessori practical life materials allow him to do just that. When a child enters the preschool, the practical life area provides the link between home and school. In the classroom, with child-sized tools that really work, the young child is able to perform the same activities he has seen adults do: polishing, scrubbing, pouring, sweeping. The pace is unhurried, and an adult is nearby to help if needed but not to interfere.

    The young child is, of course, more interested in the scrubbing motion of washing a table than he is in getting the table clean. The motions help him gain gross motor control and hand-eye coordination, which will enable him to perform successively more precise tasks.

*Care of Environment: cleaning, sweeping, gardening, ironing, polishing, etc.

*Development of Social Relations: greeting, serving, accepting, apologizing, thanking, etc.

*Movement: balancing, “walking on the line,” playing the silence game, etc.

    It is often difficult for adults to appreciate the sense of accomplishment and pride that children take in mastering practical life skills. To the adult, care of the house and body are necessary chores. The young child, however, is attracted to these activities for very different reasons. They are meaningful, creative, filled with intricate movements and achievements that hold the children’s attention. They are easily understood from start to finish; they lead to greater physical skill, perfection of movement, and concentration.

    The young child is attracted to the practical life exercises because these activities allow her to function independently in the adult world. After learning how to button her coat, tie her shoes, and wash her hands, she spontaneously repeats the exercises, working on mastery, free from unnecessary adult intervention. These exercises correspond to the child’s sensitive period for refinement of movement and coordination as well as her growing sense of independence. “I can do it by myself” is the motto of the young child, and Montessori encourages and fosters this independence.

Contact us today!


 

*Exposing the end result of this method and how it reaches a specific group of students will be of great interest to someone looking to discover these teachings.

How Montessori Education Benefits Preschoolers

     For many parents, the path to their child's success begins in preschool. Many children begin preschool at age four, although many preschools accept three- and five-year-olds, as well. While each preschool facility is different, there are many common factors that contribute to toddlers' success and emotional development. Montessori programs often combine those positive factors into the overall curriculum of the school.

    One of the biggest aspects of successful preschool programs that is reflected in the Montessori curriculum is the importance of creating art. While Montessori children are encouraged to discover art in their own time as opposed to during a specific time of day, all toddlers can benefit from creating art. Preschoolers are inspired to organize thoughts and write stories about pictures they have drawn or painted, and the actions of drawing, writing, sculpting, and gluing help develop their fine motor skills.

    In addition to visual arts, the Montessori curriculum also includes music, which can help children develop rhythm and memorize facts, letters, numbers, and dates when they are set to a tune. Keeping music in schools benefits students in almost every area of development. Children who actively play music or sing before kindergarten have been shown to play better with others, have a higher understanding of reading and math, and possess higher self-esteem than children who do not.    

    In addition to allowing students to experiment with art and music at their own pace, Montessori education encourages children to learn from peers of different ages. This gives the younger children someone to look up to, as well as teaches the older children how to be an effective leader and mentor. Students who attend Montessori schools are more interested in learning, and have a greater attention span than traditionally-educated students.

     When looking for your child's preschool, it is important to find the right facility to meet your family's needs. Consider contacting your local Montessori school to find out how they can help your child thrive.

Contact us today!


 

    *How technology ties into the overall method is explained.  Interesting features and links to technology exist between the Montessori Method and technology.

 

Technology and the Montessori School

    Isn't it curious that quite a few people who have gone on to impact the world of technology received an early education that did not include the use of computers? According to an article published by the Montessori Society AMI UK, many of the titans of Silicon Valley attended a Montessori School at some time during their formative years.

     Larry Page, one of the founders of Google, was a student at Okemos Montessori School from 1975 to 1979. Sergey Brin, Google co-founder with Page, attended Paint Branch Montessori School in Adelphi, Maryland. When the two appeared on a Barbara Walters special, The Ten Most Fascinating People of 2004, they told her they credit their Montessori schools with allowing them to think for themselves, thus fostering their creativity. Brin for his part, feels that, by giving him the freedom to pursue activities that interested him, the Montessori environment set him on the path to becoming a self-directed self-starter.

     Will Wright, the designer of the popular video game, The Sims, went to a Montessori school in Atlanta until sixth grade and Jeff Bezos, of Amazon fame, attended a Montessori preschool in Houston, Texas. In an inspiring TED speech, Wright praised Montessori for how it "taught me the joy of discovery," ..... It's all about learning on your own terms rather than a teacher explaining stuff."

    Seeing the success of these Montessori students in the world of computers, one has to wonder what Maria Montessori, who was a scientist, herself, would have thought about the use of computers in early childhood education. First off, although she might have been impressed with how the internet is able to deliver content to a child any time he looks for it, she'd probably have issues with the fact that he's sitting in front of the glass of a computer monitor or an iPad touch screen filled with abstract symbols and bright simulations, rather than actively engaged with physical objects in a real, meaningful, experiential discovery.

    Montessori believed that during the first six years of life, a child benefits by physically engaging with objects so she can create classifications to house the impressions these activities give her. Therefore, might Maria Montessori not warn that delving into cyberspace and its virtual objects at a young age will rob her of manipulating the real thing and can result in a blurring of what is real and what is not.

    Neurological research into how the child's brain develops has validated Montessori's insistence on the importance of sensory and motor experiences during the early years. Studies have found that specific neural developments take place at different ages, and those that emerge between the ages of four and six benefit from appropriate motor and sensory activities. In other words, physical engagement feeds the specific neural areas while substituting  virtual experiences deprives them of this food, and prevents them from absorbing  how the natural world works.

   Whether Maria Montessori might raise these points is impossible to say, but many working in technology argue against computer use in the classroom. The global operations director at Allied Signal, which manufactures aerospace and automotive components, is one. He credits the hands-on activities of his elementary school days with building his self-confidence, saying "if you've ever had the experience of binding a book, knitting a sock, or playing a recorder, then you feel you can build a rocket, or learn a software program", which brings up a point technology instructors would agree with. Most older students will be able to acquire computer skills in a one semester course, especially if they are grounded in the autonomy gained by their years in Montessori.

    We certainly believe this at Brookfield School, and our alumni who've passed through our doors in our more than twenty-five years of nurturing education bear this out. If you want the Montessori experience for your child, contact us to find out about our Montessori preschool, elementary school, and our new expansion into middle school.



    *We have displayed quality selling points for “Why Private School?’ in general.  We have detailed the core benefits and values of the Montessori Method as well.  Benefits amongst re-schoolers using this method and technology give a grand scope of the Montessori Method.  Hopefully, this will help you make the decision between our curriculum and the standard ones not based upon as many values as this teaching displays.

Contact us today!

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