Debunking Myths About Montessori Schools

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Deciding where your children will receive their education is one of the most important decisions you will make as a parent. As the school choice movement continues to gain momentum, parents have more options today than in years past. One of those options -- a Montessori approach to education -- is growing in popularity across the country. Yet, there are also many myths associated with Montessori schools. Let's consider six of the most persistent Montessori-related myths-- and the truth behind the misconceptions. Montessori classrooms have no structure Montessori education is a child-centered approach to learning where independence and freedom within limits are emphasized. A casual observer who is accustomed to traditional schools might initially view a Montessori classroom as unstructured, but that's simply not the case. Montessori classrooms are thoughtfully prepared with developmentally appropriate learning materials. The belief is that when children are given the flexibility and independence to explore what interests them,...
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Three Books Every Montessori School Parent Should Read

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Making the choice to send your child to  Montessori School  is a rewarding one. Your child benefits from a nurturing, fun, and child-centered environment during the day. Did you know that you can create a Montessori based environment in your home too? These books will help you to understand how to implement the methodology your child benefits from at school in your home. Teaching Montessori In The Home- The Preschool Years, by Elizabeth G. Hainstock emphasizes the importance of the first six years of life. This book is a guide for parents to bring the Montessori methodology into the home and apply it to helping their child learn every day tasks. Part one of the book provides a bio of Maria Montessori and an overview of her method. It also reviews the stages of childhood development and how the method applies to each stage. Part two presents the step by step...
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Montessori - The Three Year Cycle | Great Falls, VA

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Every year, parents of five year old Montessori preschool  children are faced with the decision of sending their children to kindergarten or to the third year of Montessori education.  Many send them back, but a few opt for kindergarten.  The latter decision may work out well on the face of it for a number of reasons.  After two years in a Montessori school a child is generally well-adjusted, alert, broadly stimulated intellectually, muscularly coordinated and has refined sensory perception.  Such a child is adaptable and, thus, performs well wherever he finds himself. This is, of course, quite pleasing to teachers and parents, and makes the child feel good. What is completely overlooked is that the child misses the fulfilling completion of the three-year cycle in a Montessori  program.  During the third year everything he has been doing for the past two years comes to maturity, resulting in exciting leaps in reading,...
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Montessori School Social Development in Multi-Age Groupings | Falls Church, VA

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                                     Excerpt from “What is Montessori Elementary?” by David Kahn Parents often ask whether the Montessori elementary  program, with its emphasis on small-group activity, provides enough opportunities for social development.  Moreover, they may wonder whether a multi-age class affords enough same-age peers for each child to have a wide choice of friends. Like Montessori preschool , Montessori elementary is based on three-year age groupings.  Students in the first, second, and third years are grouped together in the same classroom, just as three-, four-, and five-year-olds are together in the preschool.  At both levels, the multi-age grouping provides children with opportunities for broad social development. Friendships developed in a multi-age setting have depth.  Children make an effort to get along together because they know they will be together for three years.  Moreover, the presence of...
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Follow the Rhythm of the Child: The Montessori Method | McLean, VA

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               Excerpt from Brook’s Field of Dreams, 1996 Your child is like a seed growing into a flower.  The Montessori Method allows the child to grow at his or her own natural pace, and we should therefore try to let go and not be so concerned with instant results by digging out that “seed” to check on its daily development. This quote of Maria Montessori captures the beauty of her method.  She believed that children learn on their own and the goals of early childhood education  should be to cultivate a child’s natural desire to learn.  To her, learning to read, write, and do math should be as natural to the child as learning to walk and talk.  The Montessori  environment and equipment invite children to learn these  sk ills during their own periods of interest and readiness.  Teachers show their respect for the rhythm of...
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